About Bees!

A little bit about our beekeeping based brand.

Background to Bees!

Our products are created by bees from our own colonies. Try our locally produced honey and you will love it as many customers already do. Our bees forage the Cambridgeshire countryside pollinating crops and wild flowers collecting nectar to produce distinctive natural raw honey. Depending on the time of year and the hive location our bees can produce honey of varying taste and texture.

We use national hives as standard which are made of a brood chamber where the queen bee lives and lays eggs and of smaller sections called supers. Supers are where the frames of honey are extracted from during the honey harvest.

Why not view all products from our bees in our shop.

The Process of Making Honey

Browse through the tabs to see how we get your honey from flower to jar..

All of our products stem from our own bee colonies from our beeswax to our honey. Try our locally produced honey and you will love it as many customers already do. Our bees forage the Cambridgeshire countryside pollinating crops and wild flowers collecting nectar to produce distinctive natural raw honey. Depending on the time of year and the hive location our bees can produce honey of varying taste and texture.

Inspection

The bees are inspected every week to ensure that they are healthy and protected and to check that the queen is laying adequately. This is a vital part of beekeeping as it enables the beekeeper to get to know their bees and their productivity on a week by week basis. It also allows for swarm prevention.

Collection

Collection can occur throughout the beekeeping season depending on the available food for the bees, we make two main harvests one June/July and the second August/September. Bee escapes are used to move the bees away from the frames which store the honey. Once the bees have moved away from the frames full of honey it is taken to be extracted.

Extraction

The frames of honey are uncapped by using either a special tool or a knife. Once both sides of a frame are uncapped they are inserted into a honey extractor. The extractor uses centrifugal force to spin the honey from the frames, the honey then settles to the bottom of the extractor.

Filtration

The settled honey is filtered through up to three strainers (600 micron (coarse), 400 micron (medium), and 200 micron (fine) filters). This removes any impurities such as small pieces of beeswax and propolis to ensure clarity in the final product. The honey is then either stored in bulk or bottled into jars.

Bottling

The honey is poured individually into 2oz, 8oz and 1lb jars and they are inspected for quality. The jars are then labelled ready for our customers to enjoy and for sale on our online shop and farmer’s markets.

Swarms

If you want advice on collecting swarms or have a swarm that needs removing please contact us and we will either come and collect the swarm ourselves or contact a local beekeeper on your behalf, please use our contact form.

Cleaning & Preparation

This is the somewhat quiet period for beekeepers where the bees are prepared for winter. This involves reducing the hives and ensuring enough honey stores are left for the bees to feed off over the winter months. Mouse guards are attached and sugar syrup or fondant feed is given to those colonies which need it.

The remainder of the winter months are used to clean any equipment which has been used during the season and to construct any new equipment bought for the following season. This involves repairing and constructing frames and main hive parts and sterilising any previously used equipment.

+ Our Typical Year
Browse through the tabs to see how we get your honey from flower to jar..

All of our products stem from our own bee colonies from our beeswax to our honey. Try our locally produced honey and you will love it as many customers already do. Our bees forage the Cambridgeshire countryside pollinating crops and wild flowers collecting nectar to produce distinctive natural raw honey. Depending on the time of year and the hive location our bees can produce honey of varying taste and texture.

+ Inspection

Inspection

The bees are inspected every week to ensure that they are healthy and protected and to check that the queen is laying adequately. This is a vital part of beekeeping as it enables the beekeeper to get to know their bees and their productivity on a week by week basis. It also allows for swarm prevention.

+ Collection

Collection

Collection can occur throughout the beekeeping season depending on the available food for the bees, we make two main harvests one June/July and the second August/September. Bee escapes are used to move the bees away from the frames which store the honey. Once the bees have moved away from the frames full of honey it is taken to be extracted.

+ Extraction

Extraction

The frames of honey are uncapped by using either a special tool or a knife. Once both sides of a frame are uncapped they are inserted into a honey extractor. The extractor uses centrifugal force to spin the honey from the frames, the honey then settles to the bottom of the extractor.

+ Filtration

Filtration

The settled honey is filtered through up to three strainers (600 micron (coarse), 400 micron (medium), and 200 micron (fine) filters). This removes any impurities such as small pieces of beeswax and propolis to ensure clarity in the final product. The honey is then either stored in bulk or bottled into jars.

+ Bottling

Bottling

The honey is poured individually into 2oz, 8oz and 1lb jars and they are inspected for quality. The jars are then labelled ready for our customers to enjoy and for sale on our online shop and farmer’s markets.

+ Swarms

Swarms

If you want advice on collecting swarms or have a swarm that needs removing please contact us and we will either come and collect the swarm ourselves or contact a local beekeeper on your behalf, please use our contact form.

+ Maintenance

Cleaning & Preparation

This is the somewhat quiet period for beekeepers where the bees are prepared for winter. This involves reducing the hives and ensuring enough honey stores are left for the bees to feed off over the winter months. Mouse guards are attached and sugar syrup or fondant feed is given to those colonies which need it.

The remainder of the winter months are used to clean any equipment which has been used during the season and to construct any new equipment bought for the following season. This involves repairing and constructing frames and main hive parts and sterilising any previously used equipment.

Our Beekeeping Story

We have been beekeeping for ten years it is a fulfilling yet unpredictable hobby. It involves keeping to a schedule of checking the hives for problems and diseases. It is truly unique experience allowing us to understand nature from a new perspective. It opens your eyes to the importance of bees and how many crops rely on the humble insect.

We take pride in our job as beekeepers and are passionate about the subject, we take the upmost care of our bees; inspecting them at least once a week during the season to ensure healthy hives and to monitor and prevent swarming and to establish that a sufficient nectar flow is available and therefore sufficient honey is being produced. We also ensure that they are protected from cold damp weather during the winter months.

Our queens are marked according to the year and replace them on average every three years to promote healthy and productive colonies. We use British National Hives. Our bees are protected using varora mesh floors and make these and many of the other parts ourselves to ensure the highest quality at all times.

We believe that bees are essential to a sustainable future.
We believe in a sustainable approach to business.
We believe in creating bee loving habitats and supporting the environment.

Our Apiaries

The Old Weston Apiary

Old Weston Garden Farm is a small holding focusing on non-intensive methods using people-power rather than heavy machinery. Located just outside the village of Old Weston, west of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire, England. The bees are located on the edge of the smallholding in a young woodland planted with UK native trees species.

You can buy the honey produced from this quaint smallholding from our online shop or direct from the Old Weston Garden Farm shop. Our bees forage from a range of vegetable and fruit plants from raspberries to pumpkins the garden farm also grows many companion plants which encourage different types of pollinators including marigolds and borage.

The Water Newton Apiary

Water Newton is a village and civil parish in Cambridgeshire, England. Water Newton lies approximately 5 miles (8 km) west of Peterborough and sits by the side of the river Nene on the edge of the Ferry Meadows Country Park. Water Newton has a diverse history dating back to Roman times and was previously a Roman fortified garrison town known as Durobrivae.

The main nectar flow comes from wildflowers and trees around the local area which includes Ferry Meadows part of Nene Park, which produces a delicate floral and usually runny honey.

The Glatton Apiary

Situated outside the village of Glatton near Peterborough. The fields are currently used for grazing sheep. It has an abundance of wild flowers due to the neighbours previously using their field for the production of cut flowers for sale. There is also a huge diversity in types of blackberries, sloes as well as wild roses that grow amongst the hedgerows of the surrounding fields. Due to the use of the land for sheep, thistles are allowed to grow and flower, along with various different types of nettle, buttercups and daisies.

Oil seed rape which flowers early in the season is the predominant crop that the bees forage from at this site. The honey from this nectar flow is harvested after the last flowers are beginning to turn to seed and produces a sweet tasting honey which sets rapidly. Following this, the main nectar flow comes from blackberries, thistles and clover as well as wild flowers and trees within the surrounding area. The secondary harvest produces a light honey with floral notes.

Glatton was our first site and has developed into our main bee breeding site. We split colonies and produce nucleus (small five and six framed hives) in order to increase the number of bees and subsequently hives and to maintain stock for winter loses.

+ Old Weston
The Old Weston Apiary

Old Weston Garden Farm is a small holding focusing on non-intensive methods using people-power rather than heavy machinery. Located just outside the village of Old Weston, west of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire, England. The bees are located on the edge of the smallholding in a young woodland planted with UK native trees species.

You can buy the honey produced from this quaint smallholding from our online shop or direct from the Old Weston Garden Farm shop. Our bees forage from a range of vegetable and fruit plants from raspberries to pumpkins the garden farm also grows many companion plants which encourage different types of pollinators including marigolds and borage.

+ Water Newton
The Water Newton Apiary

Water Newton is a village and civil parish in Cambridgeshire, England. Water Newton lies approximately 5 miles (8 km) west of Peterborough and sits by the side of the river Nene on the edge of the Ferry Meadows Country Park. Water Newton has a diverse history dating back to Roman times and was previously a Roman fortified garrison town known as Durobrivae.

The main nectar flow comes from wildflowers and trees around the local area which includes Ferry Meadows part of Nene Park, which produces a delicate floral and usually runny honey.

+ Glatton
The Glatton Apiary

Situated outside the village of Glatton near Peterborough. The fields are currently used for grazing sheep. It has an abundance of wild flowers due to the neighbours previously using their field for the production of cut flowers for sale. There is also a huge diversity in types of blackberries, sloes as well as wild roses that grow amongst the hedgerows of the surrounding fields. Due to the use of the land for sheep, thistles are allowed to grow and flower, along with various different types of nettle, buttercups and daisies.

Oil seed rape which flowers early in the season is the predominant crop that the bees forage from at this site. The honey from this nectar flow is harvested after the last flowers are beginning to turn to seed and produces a sweet tasting honey which sets rapidly. Following this, the main nectar flow comes from blackberries, thistles and clover as well as wild flowers and trees within the surrounding area. The secondary harvest produces a light honey with floral notes.

Glatton was our first site and has developed into our main bee breeding site. We split colonies and produce nucleus (small five and six framed hives) in order to increase the number of bees and subsequently hives and to maintain stock for winter loses.

A Beekeeping Year

timeline_pre_loader
October - February

Cleaning and preparing for the following season

March

First apiary inspections of the year

April - July

Main honey flow

August - September

Our main honey harvest

Learn More About Our Brands

Earthy Roots

Earthy Roots Ltd. is a natural food and cosmetics manufacturer located in Peterborough, UK. We currently have hives located at three different sites across Cambridgeshire, spanning from Peterborough to Huntingdon.

Balms

This is our range of natural cosmetic products, initially developed under the bees brand we wanted to develop a range of 100% Natural Beeswax Lip Balms. This soon expanded to cover other ranges such as body bars and massage bars.

Jars

COMING SOON!

This is our range of preserves, chutneys, jams and pickles. Developed in house with natural ingredients. We will be launching our Jars products very soon, keep updated on our social media.